Staff Picks: Netflixs & March Madness

Welcome to our staff picks! Every few weeks, members of gnovis discuss our favorite moments in media!


1) #48–Art Critics Love Us On Yelp


I really enjoyed this recent podcast on TL;DR (an Internet-focused spinoff podcast of the NPR classic, “On the Media” ) dealing with two of my favorite things in the world: Yelp and art. They interview professional art critic Brian Droitcour about a project he did reviewing galleries and museums on Yelp, culminating in this really interesting online exhibit for the New Museum called “Fifteen Stars”. The exhibit features real Yelp reviews posted about the New Museum and some funky illustrative net-art. This project explores some cool thoughts about the accessibility of the art world and the power of the Internet to make everyday human experiences more visible. Full Linda stamp of approval.

-Linda linda pic

2) The Poetry of Emily Dickinson


Recently, I’ve returned to a few of my favorite poes by Emily Dickinson, notably an untitled poem beginning with “I measure every Grief I meet…” This version–which I consider the truer, better version–comes from her unedited collection of works. Those unfamiliar with the history of her poetry might not know that the very first collection of her works, released to the public after her death, was heavily edited by personal acquaintances. That version of the poem removes most of her unique punctuation and re-configures entire stanzas to “correct” a few slant rhymes.

Personally, I think a person’s preferred version of the poem says something about him or her as a person, but I won’t say what I mean by that! To each his own!

-Emily Emily

3) A Different World on Netflix 


An oldie but a goodie: On March 15th, streaming site Netflix released the entire series, A Different World, to its subscribers (it s also available on Hulu Plus). The show, which recounts the lives of Hillman College students over 6 seasons, is a hilarious (sometimes cheesy) look at undergrad life at an HBCU.  Originally a spinoff of The Cosby Show, A Different World became a hit in its own right during its second and third seasons. I implore any and everyone to watch this show; if for no other reason, you will finally understand the cultural significance of flip up shades.

-Tyler Tyler gnovis pic_edited-1

4) March Madness (with Data)!!


With March Madness upon us, basketball fans everywhere are rejoicing. But data nerds have reason for excitement as well. Over at, Nate Silver and crew have put together the coolest interactive NCAA bracket this basketball and data nerd has ever seen. Powered by their nifty forecast model, the interactive allows the user to dig through the data in a number of ways–mapped to the familiar bracket or as a sortable heatmap table–and lets you compare the updated results to the earlier predictions as the tournament progresses so you can check the model’s accuracy. And for all you women’s hoops fans out there tired of hearing about the men’s tournament, FiveThirty Eight has you covered–for the first time they’ve created the exact same graphic for the women’s tournament!

-Zach  Zach pic

 5) Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt 


As a serial binge watcher of TV shows, I have made it my life’s mission to consume whole serials the day of their release. Sometimes it’s exhaustive and meaningless, and sometimes it’s rewarding. Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt is the latter. Created by Tina Fey, the series was a strange but pleasant crash between The Office and 30 Rock. Given the quick humor and bright color scheme, it is often easy to forget that the premise of the show is a little dark (The show begins with 4 women who have been kept in an underground bunker for 15 years doing what I can only imagine to be unspeakable sex stuff and/or knitting). Nevertheless, season one has proved to be an easy and quick watch with a humor only Fey could concoct. Alas, there were some moments where they could’ve upped the ante and pulled a 30 Rock but it’s okay, you’re my meta little Kimmy.

-Lois Lois cropped

Tyler Goodridge

Tyler Goodridge is a second year MA candidate within Georgetown's CCT program. Her academic and professional interests include popular culture and social justice, specifically pertaining to marginalized groups within the US. She currently works as a media analyst for a women's reproductive rights organization.